Survey of Arts Management

Course blog for American University PERF-570, Fall 2014

Keeping your hand in ALL the cookie jars.

This speech by Julian Lloyd Webber stood out to me as a great reminder that artists succeed when they respect that business matters.  Between keeping an eye on business, mastering your art (classical or otherwise), and finding a way to “shake up the status quo”, it’s imperative to maintain a passion for what you do.  Even after all that work, how much of success in arts is about being in the right place at the right time?  As a manager or an artist.

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4 comments on “Keeping your hand in ALL the cookie jars.

  1. torisharbaugh
    August 28, 2014

    This is a great speech and extremely pertinent to the arts industry today. I completely agree that it is not enough for an artist to create their art, but they also need to be their own agent. Artists need to understand how the business works and how to properly market themselves. I believe part of our job as arts managers is to help create these opportunities for artists.

    However, I do wish Julian Lloyd Webber would have stressed the importance of networking in this business. Although it is an over-crowded marketplace with people auditioning, the network of professionals is smaller than we think. You never know who knows who.

  2. Samantha Sobash
    August 29, 2014

    I find this speech compelling because Julian Lloyd Webber encourages musicians to own their passion amidst the expectation to be popular if you want to be successful. While he recognizes in this day and age, people have the advantage to utilize multiple methods of marketing, he reminds us to lead with what we know. It is the challenge to take what you know best/appreciate most and find the most compelling way to share it with others. We have to celebrate our diverse passions!

    The success of an artist or arts manager is definitely beyond hard work these days. Success is driven by social interactions in this context. I think the right space and time facilitate those opportunities and its up to us as artists and arts managers to be there.

  3. jaredchamoff
    August 29, 2014

    I think that Julian Lloyd Webber is correct that young musicians cannot just play notes well and expect to succeed in the world. Every artist must be their OWN manager, in that they must put themselves out there and make connections. I also think Webber’s assertion that the Internet is a wonderful way to build connections is definitely true.

    I don’t totally agree with what he said about learning the classical music canon. When he calls students of today entitled for believing that playing great masterpieces will provide them with a long lasting career, I guess he means that students shouldn’t rest of their laurels and should always try to be progressive in their musical lives. I think this is true. Musicians who simply copy a certain playing style of another will always sound derivative of it.

    However, to discount the importance of studying masterpieces is what I do not agree with. It is through learning the works of composers of the past that musicians are able to gain a sense of the musical world. By educating themselves on the music of the past, musicians are able to gain a richer understanding of the contemporary classical world. Studying Bach and Brahms to a musician has the potential to be as important as studying math and science for a physicist. You need context to come up with your own!

  4. jaredchamoff
    August 29, 2014

    I think that Julian Lloyd Webber is correct that young musicians cannot just play notes well and expect to succeed in the world. Every artist must be their OWN manager, in that they must put themselves out there and make connections. I also think Webber’s assertion that the Internet is a wonderful way to build connections is definitely true.

    I don’t totally agree with what he said about learning the classical music canon. When he calls students of today entitled for believing that playing great masterpieces will provide them with a long lasting career, I guess he means that students shouldn’t rest of their laurels and should always try to be progressive in their musical lives. I think this is true. Musicians who simply copy a certain playing style of another will always sound derivative of it.

    However, to discount the importance of studying masterpieces is what I do not agree with. It is through learning the works of composers of the past that musicians are able to gain a sense of the musical world. By educating themselves on the music of the past, musicians are able to gain a richer understanding of the contemporary classical world. Studying Bach and Brahms to a musician has the potential to be as important as studying math and science for a physicist. You need context to come up with your own musical pursuits/theories!

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