Survey of Arts Management

Course blog for American University PERF-570, Fall 2014

Let’s Talk About Porn

In a current conservative climate, artists at Melbourne Fringe bare it all. Read about the art show entitled Feck:Art in which emerging artists try to “succeed where porn fails,” by successfully acting as an aphrodisiac. In attempt to show “great variety on what can be considered erotic,” while not commercializing sex, one theme of the whole show is socially responsible erotica. 

Art pieces include, but are certainly not limited to, orgasm selfies, women urinating on leaves, vagina photography, and at least one penis montage.

Hannah Miller, one of the show coordinators, said that in an effort to maintain the idea of socially responsible erotica it was important to choose “work that doesn’t perpetuate stereotypes or repeat negative teachings about sex that are often found in mainstream porn.”

The article states, “what differentiates the work displayed in Feck:Art from pornography? Surely the dialogue between artist and audience, which ascribes it a personal and reciprocal depth that porn lacks.”

I think this show is important for many reasons. I feel that it points out the flaws of porn while still allowing spectators to explore and understand sexuality. Simultaneously, it pushes boundaries at a time when artists are being censored for use of sexual content in their work.

It’s really a great read!

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2 comments on “Let’s Talk About Porn

  1. benjamendouglas
    September 24, 2014

    I think this is great. We need more than just watercolors of tulips. There HAS to be room for “socially responsible” erotic images. (Whatever that means…) And, of course, by being controversial, readers all over the world are now aware of the exhibit. (Again, no such thing as bad press.)

  2. awellfare89
    September 26, 2014

    I agree with Benjamin and the fact that an exhibit inside a closed space could be censored is ridiculous. This reminds me of the annual show back home called “Biting the Apple” that aims to provide the same kind of content. A comment I read by the gallery’s executive director stuck with me in that this show strives to present artists whose work wouldn’t be displayed in the state otherwise. It’s sad that such artists only have these tiny windows to act in. While I don’t know that spending time in the Melbourne show would necessarily be my kind of ideal afternoon, the fact that it provides art that is more sensitive to true nature of the natural human act than other sources of erotic content is admirable.

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